Cultural Competence in the Workplace Assessment

CulturalCompetence in the Workplace Assessment

InstitutionAffiliated:

Dateof submission:

Question1:

Explanationof how Gender, Personality, Memory, Cognition, Emotions, andDevelopment affect cultural competence in the workplace

Culturalcompetence is recognized as the capability of people to interact withothers who are from a different cultural background without beingdisturbed. Gender, personality, memory, cognition, emotions anddevelopment may have variant degrees on their impact on an individualcultural competence in the workplace[ CITATION Ela12 l 1033 ].Gender has minimal effect as either male or female may be or notculturally competent.Some researchers indicate that male and female have varying roles toplay in the cultural competence in the workplace but in the era welive in, this has drastically changed. Gender equality has enabledcultural competence to be inherent in both male and female as theyare subjected to similar roles at workplaces.

Thepersonality of a person will have a great impact on how he/shebehaves in the midst of different cultured people. The memory ofevents that may have occurred in the past, either good or bad, maymake a person feel at ease with someone of the affiliate culturerather than another. Emotions and development have an influence onthe personality of a person, therefore, the cultural competence ofthe individual in the workstations.

Question2:

Evaluatehow effective the five-factor model (FFM) of personality is inexplaining cultural competence and its flaws

Culturalcompetence is an attribute that many individuals may claim to havethough when put to the test in a diverse cultural place, they may notbe able to manifest the attribute. The five-factor model is aneffective tool for determining the probability of how an individualwould behave if faced with a situation that is required to applycultural competence[CITATION Jan12 l 1033 ].Thereare different attributes stated in the five-factor modelextraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism, openness to experience andconscientiousness and each attribute would result in differentperspective towards cultural diversity in a workplace station.

Theattributes stated by the model are qualitative in nature and cannotbe used to quantify cultural competence of a person. There is highprobability that those who possess certain described attributes inthe model would be culturally competent than the others. It,therefore, serves as a basic measure of an individual in terms ofcultural competence[ CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].

Peoplewho have extraversion attribute would mingle and interact with peopleof different cultures more easily than those who are not sociable.Agreeable individuals would only exercise politeness regardless oftheir comfort level in a situation where there are people of adifferent culture than his/hers. A conscientious individual will notmind the culture of their workmates as they only target to delivertheir tasks as they are focused on work rather than other disruptingthings[CITATION Bre11 l 1033 ].Neurotics and intellect individuals who depict emotions and aresensitive to thingsmay outlay less cultural competence. The above could prove that thefive-factor model is an effective mode of evaluations.

Majorflaws of the model include the existence of individuals having two ormore attributes stated in the model. The two or more attributes couldhave the inclusion of some of the attributes likely not to displaycultural competence in the workplace[ CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].Also the model evaluation to cultural competence is a probabilisticmeasure. There might be others who have the attribute that isexpected not to display cultural competence whereas practically theyend up being better than the rest. The model is more of a judgmentaland stochastic measure and may have a lot of loopholes in itsevaluations. The model only focuses on the character of a personwithout the determination of time[ CITATION Rob02 l 1033 ].Timecould enable a person to adapt dealing and working with others of adifferent cultural background.

Question3:

HowFive-Factor Model is used to developing better cultural competence

Diversitycauses numerous challenges for the employers and organizations ingeneral as different individuals bring different attitudes, behaviorsand needs in the workplace. Evaluation of the traits through thefive-factor model would enable an organization set policies or engagein certain activities at the workplace that would eradicate theissue[ CITATION Fra08 l 1033 ].If a person is likely to be affected bythe cultural background of another, ensuring that projects are givenin pairs, and they are paired together would enable them establish aworking bond. Ensuring that the company has numerous team buildingactivities would also reduce the cultural difference behavior againstthe other colleagues. Through the evaluation of the model, thecompany would be able to strategize on how to ensure work iscompleted well, teamwork is enhanced, and the employees are satisfiedwhile working in the organization. It would also reduce employeeconflict and enhance understanding and teamwork[ CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].

References

Bhandari, K. G. (2011). Cultural Competency in Health Care. Retrieved from College &amp Research Libraries: http://crln.acrl.org/content/72/11/648.full

Brent Braveman, J. J. (2011). Work: Promoting Participation and Productivity Through Occupational Therapy. F.A Davis Company: Philadelphia.

Congress, E. (2012). Multicultural Perspectives in Social Work Practice with Families. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Francoeur, K. A. (2008). The Relationship Between the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Leadership Preferences for Initiating Structure and Consideration. Indiana University of Pennsylvania: ProQuest.

Janice L. Dreachslin, M. J. (2012). Diversity and Cultural Competence in Health Care: A Systems Approach. John Wiley &amp Sons: San Francisco.

Jianglong, W. (2011, November 01). Communication and Cultural Competence: The Acquisition of Cultural Knowledge and Behaviour. Applied Psychology and Culture, pp. 1-12. Retrieved from Scholarworks: http://scholarworks.gvsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1064&ampcontext=orpc

McCrae, R. R. (2002, August 1). Cross-Cultural Research on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. General Psychological Issues in Cultural Perspective, pp. 1-12.

Cultural Competence in the Workplace Assessment

CulturalCompetence in the Workplace Assessment

CulturalCompetence in the Workplace Assessment

QuestionOne

Today,diversity in the workplace is more of a norm rather than an exception(Lynch &amp Hanson, 2011). Aspects such as gender, personality,memory, cognition, emotions, and development affect culturalcompetence at work. Memory affects employees’ knowledge andrecollection of their colleague’s culture. It also affects theability of individuals to remember the most significant aspects ofothers cultures, which influences their cooperation with othercultures at work. Similarly, culture’s influence is not restrictedto social norms but may also extend to the fundamental processes incognition (Ferraro, 2010). Cognition entails an individual’s mentalprocess of learning and understanding things about other cultures.Thus, perception enhances employees understanding of substantialvariations particularly based exclusively on auditory and visualattention in different cultures (Lynch &amp Hanson, 2011).

Likewise,gender is another significant aspect that affects cultural competenceat work. Men and women have substantially varying roles acrosscultures, which influence the choice of profession andresponsibilities at work. Hence, workers require understanding ofother cultures to ensure harmony and respect for their colleague’sdecisions due to their cultural requirements (Ferraro, 2010). Thenagain, people differ in personalities and understanding the characterof colleagues is profoundly important in maximizing productivity atwork. Personality defines character and attitudes that immenselyaffect their relationship with the coworkers and job performance. Onthe other hand, emotions affect an individual’s feelings towardsthe practices and values of other cultures. The cultural practicesdiffer across cultures, which affects the way people react and feeltowards other cultures (Ferraro, 2010). For example, people who havestrong feelings towards their cultural beliefs and values are morelikely to act in an emotional way when they integrate with othercultures. Lastly, the level of development measures an organization’sperformance. Similarly, personal development is equally important.Therefore, development affects changes on a daily basis, whichinfluences the employee’s decisions, thus, affecting culturalcompetence at work (Ferraro, 2010).

QuestionTwo

Thefive-factor model of personality describes the five broad traits thatsummarize most of the differences in personality across individuals.These characters include extraversion, agreeableness,conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience (McCrae,2002). The five characteristics are associated with job performance.Initially, various studies proved that conscientiousness andextraversion are positively related to job performance. Thesetraits correlate with the overall job satisfaction. Thus, satisfiedemployees are more likely to remain their current job position asthey avoid absence as compared to the discontented employees(McCrae, 2002).Later,other studies showed that openness to experience, agreeableness, andemotional stability are also related to job performance. Thesecharacteristics define the personalities that directly affect one’sability to work with others, which affects their job performance.Additionally, the model is a useful predictive tool and high invalidity. The personality traits provide employers with anexplanation for employees’ tendencies to act inconsistently overtime (McCrae, 2002).

Nonetheless,the model has flaws because the role of agreeableness, extraversion,and openness to experience vary across responsibilities and settings.Therefore, they are not applicable to all jobs. Besides, the modeldoes not address core constructs of character performance beyond thelevel of personality (Barrick, Mount &amp Judge, 2001). It tends tobe restricted to the prediction of particular behavior and theadequate description of individuals lives. Moreover, behavior doesnot necessarily reflect personality. For example, two people withdifferent personalities can engage in the same behavior but havediverse intentions.

QuestionThree

Thefive-factor model can be used in many different cultures, which meansthat it can be used to promote cultural competence. The best strategyto enhance cultural competence at work is by improving understandingof the diverse employees’ cultures and values (Lynch &amp Hanson,2011). Understandingindividual’s personality is the one of the fundamental steps indeveloping knowledge of different cultural groups. Therefore,I would use the model to understand how cultures place importance ondifferent personality dimensions. Accordingly, the understandingwould ensure that the work environment place a lot of emphasizes themost important personality traits to promote cultural competence(Barrick, Mount &amp Judge, 2001). Besides, thefive-factor model is useful in determining individual potential.Thus, it can enhance understanding among employees despite theircultural differences.

Finally,cultural competence is becoming increasingly significant forbusinesses. The employers recognize that cultural diversity isinevitable thus, the only way to improve production is ensuring thatemployees’ cultures are put into consideration. Hence, despite itsflaws, the five-factor model of personality is one way to improvecultural competence at work.

References

Barrick,M. R., Mount, M. K. &amp Judge, T. A. (2001). Personality andPerformance at the Beginning of the New Millennium: What Do We KnowAnd Where Do We Go Next? InternationalJournal of Selection and Assessment,9(1-2), 9-30. Retrieved fromhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-2389.00160/pdf

Ferraro,G. P. (2010). Thecultural dimension of international business.Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Lynch,E. W., &amp Hanson, M. J. (2011). Developingcross-cultural competence: A guide for working with children andtheir families.Baltimore, Md: Paul H. Brookes Pub.

McCrae,R. R. (2002). Thefive-factor model of personality across cultures.New York: Springer

Cultural Competence in the Workplace Assessment

CulturalCompetence in the Workplace Assessment

InstitutionAffiliated:

Dateof submission:

Question1:

Explanationof how Gender, Personality, Memory, Cognition, Emotions, andDevelopment affect cultural competence in the workplace

Culturalcompetence involves knowing one’s cultural identity and views. Inaddition, it entails learning about different cultures and otherpeople’s opinion [ CITATION Nat154 l 1033 ].Cultural competence can enhance performance levels at the workplaceamong the employees but it can also prove to be aserious headache if not properly articulated. In this section, theauthor will discuss how various elements such as gender, personality,cognition, memory as well as emotions and development can have animpact on cultural competence in the workplace. As far as gender isconcerned, relational positionalty can be used as a tool to oppressothers. This is especially in fields that are dominated by one genderand that is view as the norm, for instance nursing which is dominatedby females [CITATION Abr01 p 270 l 1033 ].Educationistslament that education only imparts knowledge rather than influencingpeople’s behavior and attitudes [ CITATION She12 l 1033 ].Unfortunatelypeople in the workplace still hold stereotypes about different ethnicpopulations. Memory and cognition of individuals is usually shaped bytheir cultural background. Therefore it is important to understandpeople backgrounds since different words are assigned differentmeanings especially when it comes to the use of proverbs [CITATION Tse08 p 27 l 1033 ].Finally, people from different backgrounds have different ways incoping with their emotions and therefore it is imperative tounderstand peoples’ culturalnorms in order to predict their actions at work and avoid anyconflicts in the workplace (Sue et al’, 2009).

Question2:

Evaluatehow effective the five-factor model (FFM) of personality is inexplaining cultural competence and its flaws

Culturalcompetence is an attribute that many individuals may claim to havethough when put to the test in a diverse cultural place, they may notbe able to manifest the attribute. The five-factor model is aneffective tool for determining the probability of how an individualwould behave if faced with a situation that is required to applycultural competence[CITATION Jan12 l 1033 ].Thereare different attributes stated in the five-factor modelextraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism, openness to experience andconscientiousness and each attribute would result in differentperspective towards cultural diversity in a workplace station.

Theattributes stated by the model are qualitative in nature and cannotbe used to quantify cultural competence of a person. There is highprobability that those who possess certain described attributes inthe model would be culturally competent than the others. It,therefore, serves as a basic measure of an individual in terms ofcultural competence[CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].

Peoplewho have extraversion attribute would mingle and interact with peopleof different cultures more easily than those who are not sociable.Agreeable individuals would only exercise politeness regardless oftheir comfort level in a situation where there are people of adifferent culture than his/hers. A conscientious individual will notmind the culture of their workmates as they only target to delivertheir tasks as they are focused on work rather than other disruptingthings[CITATION Bre11 l 1033 ].Neurotics and intellect individuals who depict emotions and aresensitive to thingsmay outlay less cultural competence. The above could prove that thefive-factor model is an effective mode of evaluations.

Majorflaws of the model include the existence of individuals having two ormore attributes stated in the model. The two or more attributes couldhave the inclusion of some of the attributes likely not to displaycultural competence in the workplace[CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].Also the model evaluation to cultural competence is a probabilisticmeasure. There might be others who have the attribute that isexpected not to display cultural competence whereas practically theyend up being better than the rest. The model is more of a judgmentaland stochastic measure and may have a lot of loopholes in itsevaluations. The model only focuses on the character of a personwithout the determination of time[ CITATION Rob02 l 1033 ].Timecould enable a person to adapt dealing and working with others of adifferent cultural background.

Question3:

HowFive-Factor Model is used to developing better cultural competence

Diversitycauses numerous challenges for the employers and organizations ingeneral as different individuals bring different attitudes, behaviorsand needs in the workplace. Evaluation of the traits through thefive-factor model would enable an organization set policies or engagein certain activities at the workplace that would eradicate theissue[ CITATION Fra08 l 1033 ].If a person is likely to be affected bythe cultural background of another, ensuring that projects are givenin pairs, and they are paired together would enable them establish aworking bond. Ensuring that the company has numerous team buildingactivities would also reduce the cultural difference behavior againstthe other colleagues. Through the evaluation of the model, thecompany would be able to strategize on how to ensure work iscompleted well, teamwork is enhanced, and the employees are satisfiedwhile working in the organization. It would also reduce employeeconflict and enhance understanding and teamwork[CITATION Wan11 l 1033 ].

References

Abrums, M. E., &amp Leppa, C. (2001). Beyond Cultrual Competence: Teaching about Race, Gender, Class and Sexual Orientation. Journal of Nursing Education, 270-275.

Braveman, B. H., &amp Page, J. J. (2011). Work: Promoting Participation and Productivity Through Occupational Therapy. Philadephia: F.A Davis Company.

Dreachslin, J. L., Gilbert, J. M., &amp Malone, B. (2012). Diversity and Cultural Competence in Health Care: A Systems Approach. San Fransico: John Wiley &amp Sons.

Francoeur, K. A. (2008). The Relationship Between the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Leadership Preferences for Initiating Structure and Consideration. Indiana University of Pennsylvania: ProQuest.

McCrae, R. R. (2002, August 1). Cross-Cultural Research on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. General Psychological Issues in Cultural Perspective, pp. 1-12.

National Education Association . (2015). Why Cultural Competence. Retrieved June 30, 2015, from National Education Association : http://www.nea.org/home/39783.htm

Sherwin, J. (2012, June). Cultural Competence in the Workplace: Challenges and Solutions. Retrieved June 30, 2015, from Leading Age Magazine : http://www.leadingage.org/Cultural_Competence_in_the_Workplace_Challenges_and_Solutions_V11N3.aspx

Sue, S., Zane, N., Nagayama Hall, G. C., &amp Berger, L. K. (2009). The Case for Cultural

Competency in Psychotherapeutic Interventions. Annual Review of Psychology, 60, 525–

548. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163651

Tseng, W.-S., &amp Strelzer, J. (2008). Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychiatry. American Psychiatric Pub.

Wang, J. (2011, November 1). Communication and Cultural Competence: The Acquisition of Cultural Knowledge and Behaviour. Applied Psychology and Culture, pp. 1-12.