Pathophysiology of Anaphylactic Shock

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Pathophysiologyof Anaphylactic Shock

Pathophysiologyof Anaphylactic Shock

Anaphylacticshock is an allergic condition that occurs rapidly, and its reactionsaffect the whole body. It is a life-threatening condition if it failsto be treated promptly. The patients first experience difficultybreathing, which then may lead to death shock. Nevertheless, thelevel of reaction varies from one patient to another. As such, thereare some people whose conditions can be addressed as outpatient caseswhile others need immediate emergency care.

Apatient suffering from mild anaphylactic condition can be treated asan outpatient. The main symptoms that characterize mild cases areuncomfortable conditions on the sin such as swelling on the feet,lips, face, hands, tongue and throat. The skin may also begin to turnred gradually while one may suffer from extreme itching. Othergeneral symptoms of anaphylactic shock that can be treated asoutpatient include common symptoms such nausea, confusion, abdominalcramping and diarrhea, warmth sensation and difficulty swallowing.Besides, when the symptoms are developing gradually, the effect ismild and less likely to cause severe harm (Huether &amp McCance,2012).

Onthe contrary, a nurse may consider sending a patient to an emergencyroom when the symptoms develop within a short time. Additionally,specific symptoms such as difficulty breathing, loss of consciousnessand decreased heart beat rate indicates that the condition is severeand needs immediate emergency care. Other symptoms that indicates apatient needs emergency care includes hoarseness, coughing, sneezingand nasal congestion, irregular heartbeat and dizziness makes onevulnerable to anaphylactic shock that is best addressed in emergencyrooms (Huether &amp McCance, 2012).

Riskhazards

Oneof the conditions that make people vulnerable to anaphylactic shockis race. People from a given background such as African Americans orLatino could be reactive to certain American cuisines that the whitestake comfortably (Huether &amp McCance, 2012).

References

Huether,S. E., &amp McCance, K. L. (2012). Understanding pathophysiology(Laureate custom ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Reference

Morris,A. (2015). Anaphylaxis.Retrieved fromhttp://www.allergy-clinic.co.uk/more-about-allergy/anaphylaxis/

Pathophysiology of Anaphylactic Shock

Pathophysiologyof AnaphylacticShock

Pathophysiologyof AnaphylacticShock

AnaphylacticShock is a form of allergic reaction that causes serious threats tohuman life and needs to be diagnosed in earlier stages ofdevelopment. A great challenge that the doctors face in treating thedisease is the dilemma it creates in recognition and managing itssymptoms. Therefore, there is need to train the emergency physiciansto identify individuals having the disease earlier enough to preventthe threats.

Theallergic reaction emerges instantly and lasts for 24 hours withdifferent body changes occurring. The body can show symptoms such asflushing, itching, shortness of breath, diarrhea or shock which maybe severe. The symptoms appear in different and a varied featurehence makes it difficult for the health care providers to identify.In addition, anaphylactic becomes challenging to identify since it isnot caused by external factors that are easily identifiable such asan insect sting (Jacobsen &amp Gratton, 2011).

Dealingwith the disease starts with checking the adequacy of oxygen to thepatient. This is done by putting the patient in a recumbent positionand allowing for circulation of air. Ensuring that there is enoughoxygen is necessary while dealing with an emergency and can causeimproved performance on the status of the person affected.Administration of epinephrine is also a major way of treatinganaphylactic shock. The administration of the drug is done throughthe lateral thigh of the patient repeatedly after 5-20 minutesdepending on the level of recovery of the patient. Theadministration of epinephrine is important when the patient issuffering a severe shock and needs an emergent treatment (Jacobsen etal, 2011).

Childrenare mostly affected by the disorder than adults since they have lowability to communicate their symptoms. Due to this factor of age, thehealth care providers are unable to identify some of the symptoms inthe children with younger age. Different genes also make individualsto become sensitive to some antigens. The body of such individualresponds to the antigen by producing an antibody. The antibody movesacross the body to specific cells, making them to release chemicalsthat cause the symptoms.

Reference

Jacobsen,R. C., &amp Gratton, M. C. (2011). A case of unrecognizedprehospital anaphylactic shock. Prehospital Emergency Care,Walden Librarydatabases15(1),61–66.