THE WORLD WAR I

THEWORLD WAR I

The World War I

An alliancerefers to a formal political, economic, or military agreement two ormore countries. Alliances may contain economic interactions betweencountries, such as investments and trade. Military alliances oftencontain support promises between two nations that are signatories,which is often during the war.

These alliances are known to be the root cause of the World War I.European nations during the 19th and mid-20thcenturies had restructured their earlier alliances1.By the beginning of 1914, Europe super powers had reshuffled andrestructured to form two powerful opposing alliances. Relationsbetween these two opposing superpowers were troubled. With theirdifferences, they rallied behind these alliances as a form ofdefensive mechanism, and thus led to the World War 1.

The UnitedStates did not join the allies since it was an independent power. Theposition of the United States was a neutral one2.This was because of the United States isolation from the rest ofEurope. The United States was isolated physically, and things in theUnited States, at the time, were running smoothly.

The industry was growing and financially, the economy was good. Therewas no good reason for the United States to get involved with thewar. The nation, however, cooperated closely with their military, butin diplomacy, it acted alone. Before it entered the war, the UnitedStates only made supplies such as money and raw materials to otheralliances. It was until 1918 that the United Nations entered the war.The United States entered war because of the Germans3.In 1917, the German minister invited Mexico, which at the time wasforeign-torn, to join them as their ally against U.S. A telegram wasintercepted by the British and sent to the United States. The UnitedStates saw it as a cause to start the war.

While there was great opposition in the United States about the war,the U.S position was that it could not tolerate such kind ofimposition on their rights when it was a sovereign state. This wasalso far from the “Zimmerman Telegram”, but close to reason forengaging in the World War.4The United States entry broke what had earlier been a stalemate.

The United States troops became instrumental in containing Germanoffensiveness. This led to Allied offensiveness, which many of theEuropeans hoped that the United Stated entry into the world war wouldend up in a treaty, which was based on the “Wilson’s FourteenPoints”. However, the “Treaty of Versailles”, which endedofficially the conflict helped contain few of the provisions.

After the war,the British, French, and Russian government imposed penalties on theeconomy on the German during the “Treaty of the Versailles”5.The U.S senate after the world did not approve the treaty, but wasforced to sign separate treaties with the Germans and its allies. TheGermans became the subject of hate. The World War I aftermath saw theU.S became intolerant to foreigners. The United States went ahead andfinance rebuilding of Europe and efforts of reparation in Germanyuntil the beginning of the Great Depression.

Bibliography

Berkin, Carol, Christopher L. Miller, and Robert W. Cherny. 2013.Making America A History of the United States. Boston, Mass:Wadsworth, 221-234

Cohen, Warren I. 2007. The American revisionists the lessons ofintervention in World War I. Chicago: University of ChicagoPress, 98-118

Kennan, George F. 1984. The fateful alliance: France, Russia, andthe coming of the First World War. New York: Pantheon Books,192-201

  1. 1Berkin, Carol, Christopher L. Miller, and Robert W. Cherny. 2013. Making America A History of the United States. Boston, Mass: Wadsworth, 220-221

  1. 2Cohen, Warren I. 2007. The American revisionists the lessons of intervention in World War I. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 98-99

  1. 3Kennan, George F. 1984. The fateful alliance: France, Russia, and the coming of the First World War. New York: Pantheon Books, 191

  1. 4Cohen, The American Revisionists, 99

  1. 5Berkin et al., Making America, 222