Theories of Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theoriesof Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theoriesof Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theyare various theories of aging. The aim of this essay is to definesome of them and also focus on how they relate to the aging process.This paper is going to be focusing on: the activity, disengagementGerotranscendence, Continuity and the Exchange Theories.

Theactivity theory

Thistheory suggests that the aging process is a psychosocial process andalso emphasizes on the importance of physical activity in anindividual’s social activity. The theory further suggests that aperson’s personal concept if actively related to the roles orduties performed by the given character. It claims that it is notwrong for a person to retire as long as they are still active inother physical activity. In relation to the aging process Ipersonally think that a person should be physically active so as slowdown the aging process although not permanently as aging is aninevitable process. In young adulthood, one should be physicallyactive so as to develop enough energy to support them during old age.In old age one should not involve themselves in too much physicalactivity although a little physical activity should be practiced.

Disengagementtheory

Thisis also another theory that seems to explain the aging process. Ithas been described as the first ever theory to try and explain theaging process. The theory argues that the withdrawal of an individualfrom society can also affect the aging process of the individual. Itfurther states that as people get older they tend to be less involvedwith life in general and tend to concentrate on a few things. Inrelation to the aging process, it is important for a person to engagein life, as they grow old as the theory states it will help slow downthe aging process. During middle age, one should try to be active inlife at the same time concentrating with life so as to be active.

Continuitytheory

Thetheory suggests that a person usually adapts to their own aging inthat they tend to stick to a particular strategy or routine ofperforming their duties or roles. It states that people should trymaintaining their internal and external structures by using certainstrategies that will help maintain continuity. At young adulthood,one is usually developing new strategies of doing things. They tendto focus on the strategies in middle age, as they will always use thestrategies while performing those duties. It is at old age is whereones character is defined by the strategies they use while performingtheir duties.

Gerotranscendencetheory

Thistheory suggests that the process of aging can be described as theability of a person to have the potential of growing into somethingcalled Gerotranscendence. This is basically the shift in of anindividual’s perspective of life from a more materialistic point ofview to a transcendent and more cosmic this is usually driven by anincrease in the level of life’s satisfaction. The theory suggeststhat a person is controlled by the raw urge to live up to their fullpotential. Moving from young adult to old age is driven by the factthat one wants to live to their full potential.

Theexchange theory

Itsuggests that the exchange of social and economic resources is acrucial aspect in human interactions. The theory suggests that peopleshould maintain their interactions with the social world as thiskeeps him/her busy and this helps slow down the aging process inolder adults. It argues that people create interactions at youngadulthood nature them during middle age and finally stick to themduring old age.

References

Jin,K. (2010). Modern Biological Theories of Aging. AgingAnd Disease,1(2), 72. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995895/

Muller,F. L., Lustgarten, M. S., Jang, Y., Richardson, A., &amp Van Remmen,H. (2007). Trends in oxidative aging theories. FreeRadical Biology and Medicine,43(4), 477-503.

Sphweb.bumc.bu.edu,.(2015). Theorieson Aging.Retrieved 23 June 2015, from http://sphweb.bumc.bu.edu/otlt/MPH-Modules/PH/Aging/Aging3.html

Theories of Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theoriesof Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theoriesof Aging and Their Relation to the Aging Process

Theyare various theories of aging. The aim of this essay is to definesome of them and also focus on how they relate to the aging process.This paper is going to be focusing on: the activity, disengagementGerotranscendence, Continuity and the Exchange Theories.

Theactivity theory

Thistheory suggests that the aging process is a psychosocial process andalso emphasizes on the importance of physical activity in anindividual’s social activity. The theory further suggests that aperson’s personal concept if actively related to the roles orduties performed by the given character. It claims that it is notwrong for a person to retire as long as they are still active inother physical activity. In relation to the aging process Ipersonally think that a person should be physically active so as slowdown the aging process although not permanently as aging is aninevitable process. In young adulthood, one should be physicallyactive so as to develop enough energy to support them during old age.In old age one should not involve themselves in too much physicalactivity although a little physical activity should be practiced.

Disengagementtheory

Thisis also another theory that seems to explain the aging process. Ithas been described as the first ever theory to try and explain theaging process. The theory argues that the withdrawal of an individualfrom society can also affect the aging process of the individual. Itfurther states that as people get older they tend to be less involvedwith life in general and tend to concentrate on a few things. Inrelation to the aging process, it is important for a person to engagein life, as they grow old as the theory states it will help slow downthe aging process. During middle age, one should try to be active inlife at the same time concentrating with life so as to be active.

Continuitytheory

Thetheory suggests that a person usually adapts to their own aging inthat they tend to stick to a particular strategy or routine ofperforming their duties or roles. It states that people should trymaintaining their internal and external structures by using certainstrategies that will help maintain continuity. At young adulthood,one is usually developing new strategies of doing things. They tendto focus on the strategies in middle age, as they will always use thestrategies while performing those duties. It is at old age is whereones character is defined by the strategies they use while performingtheir duties.

Gerotranscendencetheory

Thistheory suggests that the process of aging can be described as theability of a person to have the potential of growing into somethingcalled Gerotranscendence. This is basically the shift in of anindividual’s perspective of life from a more materialistic point ofview to a transcendent and more cosmic this is usually driven by anincrease in the level of life’s satisfaction. The theory suggeststhat a person is controlled by the raw urge to live up to their fullpotential. Moving from young adult to old age is driven by the factthat one wants to live to their full potential.

Theexchange theory

Itsuggests that the exchange of social and economic resources is acrucial aspect in human interactions. The theory suggests that peopleshould maintain their interactions with the social world as thiskeeps him/her busy and this helps slow down the aging process inolder adults. It argues that people create interactions at youngadulthood nature them during middle age and finally stick to themduring old age.

References

Jin,K. (2010). Modern Biological Theories of Aging. AgingAnd Disease,1(2), 72. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2995895/

Muller,F. L., Lustgarten, M. S., Jang, Y., Richardson, A., &amp Van Remmen,H. (2007). Trends in oxidative aging theories. FreeRadical Biology and Medicine,43(4), 477-503.

Sphweb.bumc.bu.edu,.(2015). Theorieson Aging.Retrieved 23 June 2015, from http://sphweb.bumc.bu.edu/otlt/MPH-Modules/PH/Aging/Aging3.html